Right menu

Featured resource

Algebra Tiles Australia

Algebra Tiles

Algebra tiles use an area model to bridge from the concrete to the abstract by showing students various processes in a visual manner that can then be translated into symbolic language.

Members: $ 25.00 inc.GST Others: $ 31.25 inc.GST


Home > Topdrawer > Fractions > Good teaching > Fraction sense > Fractions as numbers

Fractions as numbers

There are several concepts that support a sense of fractions as numbers, and that also support the development of strategies for comparing the size of fractions.

Students should be able to:

  • reason that the larger the denominator of a fraction, the smaller the parts of the whole. This leads to a useful strategy for comparing the relative size of unit fractions with different denominators, such as \(\frac{1}{4}\) and \(\frac{1}{6}\)
  • understand that the larger the difference between the numerator and the denominator, the closer the fraction is to zero; for example: \(\frac{1}{4}\) is close to 0, and \(\frac{1}{8}\) is even closer.
    Similarly, the smaller the difference between the numerator and the denominator, the closer the fraction is to one whole; for example: \(\frac{6}{8}\) is close to 1, and \(\frac{7}{8}\) is even closer
  • count by fractions of the same denominator (e.g. \(\frac{1}{4}\), \(\frac{2}{4}\), \(\frac{3}{4}\), \(\frac{4}{4}\), \(\frac{5}{4}\))
  • realise that fractions are numbers and therefore have a position on a number line.

Sequencing and counting

Students develop strategies for placing fractions on a number line in relation to other fractions and to whole numbers, up to 1 and beyond 1.

Comparing unit fractions

The digital learning object supports students in making connections between the written unit fraction, a length representation of the fraction and the fraction’s position on the number line.